terça-feira, 19 de março de 2019

Desafios para 2019 / Challenges for 2019

Há um ano atrás o desafio foi subir a montanha mais alta da ilha de Hokkaido (Japão) – Monte Asahidake (2.291m) – e a montanha mais alta do Japão – o Monte Fuji (ilha de Honshu, 3.766m) – durante o inverno. Em Setembro desse ano (2018) considerei terminado o projeto ‘Cume mais alto de cada país da Europa’, depois de alcançado o ponto mais alto da Irlanda (Carrauntoohil, 1.039m), e por ‘embalagem’ também os da Bélgica (Signal du Botrange, 694m) e Luxemburgo (Bourgplatz, 559m), além de todos os cumes de altitude superior a 740 metros anteriormente alcançados (e considerando que altitudes inferiores a 740m não são de montanhas mas de simples colinas).

Depois das tristemente já frequentes imagens de violência no futebol (sobretudo nas últimas semanas), decidi que deixarei de assistir a partidas deste desporto (na televisão, porque aos estádios há muito que deixei de ir). Estou farto destes grupos de frustrados, liderados por perturbados violentos, que em nome de ‘não-sei-quê-nem-me-interessa’ não hesitam em provocar desacatos e agressões. Estes comportamentos gregários, como ovelhas num curral, representam a antítese da minha forma de estar…

Assim, para 2019, proponho-me duas travessias (bem longe dos ares poluídos do fanatismo futebolístico): Córsega e Suécia.

1. Ilha de Córsega: travessia de sueste para noroeste; 180 km (dizem que um dos mais duros da Europa), na companhia de uma cadelinha de 10 anos de idade, cega de um olho, que terei que carregar nas passagens mais comprometidas ou sempre que se encontre cansada. Serão cerca de 14 dias entre Maio e Junho.





2. Suécia: travessia do país em kayak, de Este para Oeste, utilizando rios, canais e lagos, numa extensão de mais de 630 km. Será em Setembro.



Viva o ar puro!



One year ago my challenge was to climb the highest mountain in Hokkaido Island (Japão) – Mount Asahidake (2.291m) – and the highest mountain of Japan – Mount Fuji (Honshu isl., 3.766m) – during the winter. In september (2018) I considered finished the ‘Highest summit of each European country’ project, after reached the highest point of Irland (Carrauntoohil, 1.039m), and, using the inertia, also the highest of Belgium (Signal du Botrange, 694m) and Luxemburg (Bourgplatz, 559m), besides all the summits above 740 meters of altitude already climbed (considering that below this height we will be talking about hills and not mountains).

After the sad and evermore frequent images of violence in football (especially during the last weeks), I’ve decided to stop watching matches from this sport (on TV, I mean, since live on the stadiums I no longer go for many years). I’m sick of those groups of frustrated people, leaded by violent disturbed ones, that in the name of ‘I-don’t-know-what-and-I-don’t-care’ do not hesitate to provoke disrespect and aggressions. These gregarious behaviors, like ship in a corral, represents the antitheses of my way being…

So, for 2019, I’ve proposed myself two crossings (away from those polluted atmospheres of the football fanatics): Corsica and Sweden.

1. Corsica island: crossing from southeast to northwest; 180 km (some say one of the hardest in Europe), accompanied by a 10 years old little dog, one-eye blind, which I’ll have to carry on every difficult passage or whenever she gets tired. It will take me around 14 days, between May and June.

2. Sweden: kayak crossing of the country from east to west, using rivers, canals and lakes, in an extension of more than 630 km. It will take place in September.

Long live the fresh-air!

terça-feira, 2 de outubro de 2018

Europa summits / Cumes da Europa

The highest peak of every European country’ project  (English/Português)


Project finished in 25th Sep.2018

Project: consisted in climbing the relevant highest summit of each country of Europe (if possible on foot, by whichever route).

Resume:
This project began in June 2005, with the climb of the Swiss (Doufourspitze), German (Zugspitze) and Austrian (Grossglockner) summits, after having climbed the absolute highest of Spain (2002) and Portugal (2003). The first relevant peak climbed, however, was the Toubkal (the highest of Morocco), 4.167 meters, in October 1996.
To this date I have climbed 138 times to the summit of 115 mountains (counting with 23 repetitions and 3 unsuccessful climbs).
After 13 years (or 16 if counting right after the first European summit actually climbed), I’ve finished the climb of each of the highest summit of every country in Europe, above 740 meters of altitude (below this altitude I will not consider the elevations as peaks or mountains but, at the most, as hills).
According to the list below, there are 49 highest points for 49 countries in Europe, and I have stepped on 38 of them, but I will consider only 36 of that total as ‘the highest summits’ since in some countries (like in Malta or Denmark) their highest point (253 and 170 meters, respectively) are located on a plane, near the road. So, in the case of this project, the least elevated peak is 977 meters high (Wales), and the highest of all is 5.642 meters high (Russia).
The approximate sum of the heights of those 36 elevations is 93 thousand meters, being the minimum height climbed (difference between the summit altitude and the altitude of the starting point) 51 thousand and 6 meters (it is considerably more if counting the real total accumulated). For this undertaking I have taken a total of 151 hours and 30 minutes for the climings to the summits; spent 284 hours and 10 minutes moving on the mountain (from starting point til the return to this point); and invested 47 days, directly on the approach on foot and reaching of the peaks (not counting with the plain and car trips; nor with the two unsuccessful climbs to the Mont Blanc, which would sum another 4 days).

Stories:
I can mention that all summits were reached at first attempt, except the Mont Blanc (France) that demanded 3 attempts (in the first 2 occasions the bad weather, besides logistics, at 3,8 thousand meters and above, called for a quick retreat). Some peaks (around 20% of the total) were reached in difficult weather conditions (rain, snow, wind, fog…) – Snowdonia (Wales), Ben Nevis (Scotland), Hoverla (Ucrania), Kebnekaise (Sweden) –, others, in the most absolute darkness (intense fog) – that was the case of Rudoka (Kosovo), Mali Maglic (Bosina-Herzegovina), Havvandalshnúkur (Iceland). In othes cases – Elbrus (Russia) – the bad weather surprised half way to the summit but did not bothered reaching it.  
The funniest cases, however, were the arrival at the Great Rudoka peak (2.658m), through Macedonia, during which I felt I had to hide from military vehicles to make sure they wouldn’t take me for a smuggler; I crossed myself with a group of smugglers pretending to be fishermen (but dressed in military uniforms); and started the climb with no detailed map or any idea of the path, waiting to have the summit on sight. I followed several paths and tracks; the thick fog made me look for marks every 50 meters and, on the return down from the summit, literally blind, I had to try several options avoiding the steep cliffs falling to the Kosovo side.










On Mount Olimpo (Mytikas, 2.917m), Greece, the fog surprised me during the descent, after I had passed on the second highest summit (Skolio, 2.912m). I found myself walking in circles inside a wide depression in the shape of a pan, knowing that in one of the directions there was a dangerous cliff (seen on the way up). I sat for half an hour on the grass waiting for a hole on the clouds that would allow me to re-orientate myself…






The most exposed: Grossglockner (3.798m), in Austria. The pyramid of the summit, after having crossed a very narrow and exposed crest, presents a considerable steepness and requires the use of ropes to rappel down.

The longest: in my case, Mount Ararat (5.165m), in Turkey, demanded 3 days to reach the top and return. However, considering the number of hours walked to reach the summit and return, the Mont Blanc (4.808m), in France, took the lead with 18 hours and 5 minutes; in second, came the Doufourspitze (4.634m), Monte Rosa, Switzerland, with 15 hours and 30 minutes.

The most complicated: Deravica (2.656m), in Kosovo, is considered the highest summit of Serbia (although the second highest in Kosovo). The approach via Montenegro requires official authorization since long part of the borders are not yet defined – the long waiting time due to difficulties in communication, burocracy (request at military headquarters, closed during weekend, payment at a bank, returnig to get ‘the paper’, …), mountain road repairs due to mud avalanche, did not allow me to reach the starting point before past 11 a.m.. After 8 hours and 35 minutes of fast walking, through steep ridges of Montenegro, Albania and Kosovo, I’ve made it to get back as the night was falling (that faraway area is known by wolf attacks).


In the case of Havvandalshnúkur (2.110m), in Iceland, despite the low altitude, the starting point is located at sea level. Also, the high latitude (close to the Arctic Polar Circle) is the best guaranty for unstable weather. Besides the many deep crevasses on the two main routes through the glaciers, the local population still suffers from the syndrome of the disappearance of two Germans, swallowed by one of those in 2015 and never found again. My climb, besides done under a strong and cold wind, was marked by a total ‘white out’ from the glacier plateau onwards, and took me around 10 hours on the move.



The easiest: Kékestetö, in Hungary, with 1.014 meters of altitude. To get there one just has to park the car 5 minutes away (one can also use the chairlifts, if working, since there is a small sky resort right on the spot). If the option is to walk from a further distance, the difficulty will still be low since there are no step parts.

The most… different: the Olympus (1.950m), on the Trodos mountains of Cyprus, is located more than 50 km away from Limassol city, on the south coast. Once the roads reach all the way to the top (where Cyprus and British military facilities are to be found), I have covered that distance in a road bicycle (108 km to go and return, in 6 hours and 25 minutes).


Nuno Marques, Jiri Gono, and Sofia Holgersson have participated on the logistics and climb of some of these mountains. For that, here stands my recognition and deep appreciation to all of them.

Best photos: see bottom


Por País da Europa
Cume/Peak
Altitude

por ordem altitude
1
Russia
Elbrus
5.642
2
France
Mont Blanc
4.808
3

Italy
Monte Bianco Courmayeur
4.748
(e GranParadiso, 4.061m)
4
Switzerland
Dufourspitze
4.634
5
Austria
Grossglockner
3.798
6
Spain
Teide
3.718
7
Germany
Zugspitze
2.962
8
Andorra
Pic Coma Pedrosa
2.942
9
Bulgaria
Moussala Vrh
2.925
10
Greece
Monte Olimpo v Mytikas
2.917
11
Slovenia
Triglav
2.863
12
Albania
Korab
2.753
13
Macedonia
Korab
2.753
14
Kosovo
Great Rudoka
2.658
15
Serbia
Deravica
2.656
16
Slovakia
Gerlach
2.655
17
Liechtenstein
Grauspitz
2.599
18
Romania
Moldoveanu
2.544
19
Montenegro
Bobotov Kuk
2.522
Zla Kolata
2534
20
Poland
Rysy
2.499
21
Norway
Galdhopiggen
2.468
22
Bosnia
Maglic II
2.386
23
Portugal
Pico
2.351
24
Iceland
Hvannadalshnukur
2.110
25
Sweden
Kebnekaise
2.111
26
Ucrania
Goveria/Hoverla
2.061
27
Cyrus
Olympus
1.953
Troodos
28
Croatia
Dinara
1.831
29
Check Rep
Snezka
1.603
30
Scotland
Ben Nevis
1.344
31
Finland
Haltiatunturi
1.331
32
Wales
Snowdonia
1.085
33
Irland
Carrauntoohil
1.039
34
Turkey
Ararat
5.165
Mahya Dagi
1.018
35
Hungary
Kekes
1.015
36
England
Scafell Pike
977
UK x 3 =
3.406
37
San Marino
Titano
739
38
Belgium
Botrange
694
39
Luxemburg
Bourgplatz
559
40
Moldova
Kodry
429
41
Bielorussia
Dzerzinskaja
346
42
Holand
Vaalserberg
321
43
Estonia
Munamagi
318
44
Letonia
Gaizinakaln
312
45
Lituania
Punta vilnius
293
46
Malta
Ta'Dmejrek /Dingli
253
47
Denamark
Mollehoj/Yding Skovhoj (173 artif)
170
48
Monaco
-
-
49
Vatican
-
-


Cumes da Europa 

O pico mais alto de cada país da Europa                       

Projeto concluído a 25.Set.2018.

Projeto: consistia em subir o cume (relevante) mais alto de cada país da Europa (se possível a pé e não importando a via).

Balanço:
O projeto teve início em Junho de 2005, com a ascensão aos cumes da Suíça (Doufourspitze), Alemanha (Zugspitze) e Áustria (Grossglockner), após ter subido aos mais elevados absolutos de Espanha (2002) e Portugal (2003). O primeiro cume relevante subido, no entanto, foi o Toubkal (o mais elevado de Marrocos), 4.167 metros, em Outubro de 1996. Há data da finalização deste projeto tinha ascendido a 138 vezes a cumes de 115 montanhas (sendo que 23 vezes foram repetições e 3 subidas não tiveram sucesso)
Ao fim de 13 anos (ou 16 anos, se contando o primeiro cume efetivamente subido), concluí a escalada a todos e cada um dos cumes mais altos de cada país da Europa, acima de 740 metros de altitude (sendo que abaixo dessa altitude não considerarei as elevações como picos ou montanhas mas, quando muito, apenas como colinas).
Conforme o quadro acima, a lista inclui um total de 49 pontos mais altos de cada país, sendo que pisei 38 deles, mas que considero somente 36 desse total como ‘os cumes mais altos’ (excluindo por isso certos países como Malta ou Dinamarca, cujos pontos mais elevados (com 253 e 170 metros de altitude, respetivamente) estão numa planície, à beira da estrada). Como tal, no caso deste projeto, o cume menos elevado encontra-se a 977 metros de altitude (Gales), e o mais elevado a 5.642 metros (Rússia).
A soma aproximada das elevações daqueles 36 cumes ascendidos é de 93 mil metros, sendo que o desnível direto mínimo ascendido (diferença entre a altitude do cume e a do ponto de partida) alcança os 51 mil e 6 metros (bastante mais seria se contasse o desnível total acumulado real). Para tal empreendimento, demorei um total de 151 horas e 30 minutos nas subidas aos cumes; 284 horas e 10 minutos no total demorado em movimento na montanha (entre o ponto de partida e o regresso a esse ponto); mas investi 47 dias diretamente na aproximação a pé e chegada a cumes (sem contar, portanto, com as viagens em avião e automóvel para chegar ao ponto de partida; nem as duas tentativas falhadas ao Monte Branco que somariam mais 4 dias).

Histórias:
Poderei realçar que todos os cumes foram alcançados à primeira tentativa, exceto o Monte Branco (França) que exigiu 3 tentativas (em duas ocasiões o mau tempo, além da logística, dos 3,8 mil metros para cima, aconselhou a retirada). Alguns cumes (cerca de 20% do total) foram alcançados em condições meteorológicas adversas – Snowdonia (Gales), Ben Nevis (Escócia), Hoverla (Ucrânia), Kebnekaise (Suécia) –, outros, às apalpadelas, na mais absoluta ‘escuridão’ (nevoeiro cerrado) – casos do Rudoka (Kosovo), Mali Maglic (Bósina-Herzegovina), Havvandalshnúkur (Islândia). Casos houve em que o mau tempo surpreendeu a meio caminho mas não incomodou a chegada ao cume: Elbrus (Rússia).
Os casos mais anedóticos foram, no entanto, a chegada ao Great Rudoka (2.658m), através da Macedónia, durante a qual me escondi de militares para não ser confundido com um contrabandista; me cruzei com um grupo de salteadores que se faziam passar por pescadores (com uniforme militar); e parti sem mapa e sem ideia do caminho à espera de ter o cume à vista. Segui várias pistas; o espesso nevoeiro fazia-me procurar marcas a cada 50 metros e, no regresso do cume, literalmente às apalpadelas, tive que experimentar várias opções de caminho, sendo que a vertente para o lado kosovar era completamente vertical.
No caso do Monte Olimpo (Mytikas, 2.917m), Grécia, o nevoeiro surpreendeu-me na descida, após passagem pelo segundo cume mais elevado (Skolio, 2.912m). Encontrei-me a caminhar em círculos dentro de uma depressão em forma de panela, sabendo que numa das direções, observada na subida, não havia passagem devido a um desnível vertical. Sentei-me na relva à espera de uma aberta, que apareceu fugazmente passada meia-hora, até poder retomar o caminho evitando o precipício.

O mais exposto: o Grossglockner (3.798m), na Áustria. A pirâmide do cume, após atravessar uma crista muito estreita e exposta, apresenta uma inclinação muito considerável e aconselha o uso de corda para rapelár.

O mais longo: no meu caso, o Monte Ararat (5.165m), na Turquia, exigiu 3 dias. No entanto, em quantidade de horas caminhadas para chegar ao cume e voltar, o Monte Branco (4.808m), em França, levou a palma com 18 horas e 5 minutos; em segundo lugar veio o Doufourspitze (4.634m), cume do Monte Rosa, Suíça, com 15 horas e 30 minutos.

O mais trabalhoso: o Deravica (2.656m), no Kosovo, é considerado o cume mais elevado da Sérvia (o segundo mais elevado do Kosovo). A aproximação via Montenegro obriga a autorizações militares já que extensas partes da fronteira não estão ainda definidas – os elevados tempos de espera devido a dificuldades de comunicação, burocracias (pedido de autorização em dia de semana, pagamento no banco, regresso ao quartel para o ‘papel’) e obras de reparação na estrada de montanha devido a aludes, só me permitiram chegar ao ponto de partida depois das 11 da manhã pelo que, após 8 horas e 35 de caminhada a ritmo rápido, com passagens por vertentes muito empinadas no Montenegro, Albânia e Kosovo, já entrava a noite quando regressei ao ponto de partida.
No caso do Havvandalshnúkur (2.110m), na Islândia, apesar da reduzida altitude, o ponto de partida localiza-se ao nível do mar, e a alta latitude (próxima do Círculo Polar Ártico) é garantia de tempo instável. Além de as vias estarem pejadas de crevasses profundas (atravessam glaciares), a população vive ainda a síndrome do desaparecimento de dois alemães que, engolidos por uma daquelas, nunca mais foram localizados. A minha subida, além de realizada sob um vento forte e frio, ficou marcada por um ‘white out’ total a partir do plateau do glaciar e tardou quase 10 horas.

O mais fácil: Kékestetö (ou ‘Kekas’), na Hungria, com 1.014 metros de altitude. Para chegar basta estacionar a 5 minutos de distância (também se pode chegar em telecadeiras pois o cume situa-se no topo de uma pequena estação de ski). Na opção de caminhar desde mais longe, a dificuldade é sempre muito reduzida pois não existem desníveis demasiado inclinados.

O mais… diferente: o Olympus (1.950m), nas montanhas Trodos do Chipre, encontra-se a mais de 50 km de Limassol, na costa sul. Uma vez que a estrada chega ao cume (povoado por instalações militares cipriotas e inglesas), percorri a distância em bicicleta de estrada (108 km ida e volta em 6 horas e 25 minutos).

Participaram na logística e escalada de algumas destas montanhas: Nuno Marques, Jiri Gono, Sofia Holgersson. O meu reconhecimento e profundo agradecimento aos três.

Melhores fotos:

Doufourspitze, cume do Monte Rosa (Suiça)

Doufourspitze 

Doufourspitze 

 Zugspitze, Alemanha

 Grossglockner, Áustria

Carrauntoohil, Irlanda - last summit

 Elbrus, Rússia

 Elbrus

 Elbrus

 Gran Paradiso,Itália

 Mont Blanc, France

Mont Blanc